Motivated Writing

Alright, so, I have no doubt that you’ve. heard about Covid 19 by now (to that I attach, stay safe, but also be considerate of others; it’s a crazy world we live in). I’m not sure how things are working for you right now, whether you’re required to stay inside, or you’ve chosen to-or maybe you’re like my family, and because of my parent’s jobs, life has to go on. But even with all that said, I think we can agree comfortably that almost all places have either closed/ or just aren’t the most ideal place to be right now. So, I realize that for a lot of people, that means that they aren’t going to be in their writing element/ finding inspiration is going to be a bit of a tricky task. So I decided that now would be a perfect time to put together a list of ways that you can stay motivated to write, even when you’re usual inspirations/motivations aren’t accessible.

1. A Playlist

There’s a good chance that you’ve already done this, but I thought I’d go ahead and add it to the list. If you don’t have one, take time to put together one; if you were to picture your writing in a movie (or documentary), then what would be the soundtrack you’d like to see go with it? North Central University wrote an article (most likely for their students), discussing how listening to certain music can help with studying. Their top suggestions were something with 60-70 beats (Beethoven’s Fur Elise), or if you’re not a classical type of person, New Age or ambient EDM.

Science of the People also wrote about how it helps with memory. They cited a study completed by Kansas Medical Center, where they investigated the effects of music and the cognitive effects of it. In it, they drew this into how Doctors also use music to help with memory loss. Which, all of these are extreme cases, but, if you were listening to specific music before, I have a suspicion that what you were writing before, might just be triggered by the music you play. And if you weren’t listening to music before this, now’s a good reason for you to give it a shot.

2. Pinterest

Personally, I love Pinterest. It might be a dangerous place for me to try and exist (oh the memes, I love a good meme), but I also have several pinboards for my stories and writing tips, (so I can download the memes to my phone-I’m shameless), that I can add to, or revert back to when I’m on the struggle bus with inspiration. To be completely honest with you, I didn’t really consider it as something for my stories until I was talking with other writers who suggested it. Now I have boards where I store my character’s clothing/appearance inspiration, and aesthetics.

Lengthy spill out of the way, I will say you should check out The Fake Redhead, she has fabulous writing prompts (I don’t think she’s solely on Pinterest, though you can find several of her prompts on there), they’re really funny and make for a great read. My personal favorite pass time last year was stringing them together trying to make a coherent story (chefs kiss, let me tell you).

3. Set up a designated writing space

I don’t know how some people go out in public and write their stories; I’m a paranoid baby, who is embarrassed by her work (irony, I know, it’s irony). I also can’t write very well when my families around-again, easily embarrassed. So really, I write in my room. On my bed. Under the covers. With a lock on all my documents-OKAY, I’m getting off-topic, (but like I said, paranoid, prideful, those are two ‘P’ words to describe me). So anyway, I’ve been working on the idea of having a designated writing spot, other then my bed, I have a desk, which, funny enough, I’ve been using since yesterday-however, beforehand I would make my bed and try and make it comfortable enough as a writing space. I added these really cool bulb lights, and then when I moved over to my desk and bookshelf, I decorated those (a little, it’s a small desk). Just having some organization and having some of my favorite little nick-nacks surrounding really does help. Not to mention, I think there is something to say about having a designated workplace, that you look at, and it reminds you to write-HOWEVER

4. Switch it up.

If you’re a writer looking for their inspiration in the outside world, then it might be best to take some time to move your room around, or even moving to the living room or dining room to write; the change might give you a fresh outlook. If the weather’s nice, maybe try opening a window (or if your window’s always opened, try closing it). WGU also suggests finding better lighting for your studying (which can of course, be applied to your writing as well). I don’t really have science behind this tip, it’s just a suggestion that sometimes I, even the awkward paranoid writer uses from time to time. I understand that your space may be limited, but that’s when it’s time to either break out Pinterest again, and get some tips, or even just switch something up that’s noticeable, like, as aforementioned, your lighting or maybe try a new candle.

5. Work on a writing warm-up.

I don’t know if I’ve used this before, but it’s probably one of the best ones that I have; mainly because it’s not mine, but my friends. Before they write, they have a wind-down/ warm-up for it. Which makes sense, because when you’re in sports, you warm-up, and work to get yourself motivated to do it, so it’s really the same effect with writing. Essentially the idea is, you have a list of things you complete every time you get down to writing. I.E, maybe you read a chapter in your favorite book, or a book closely related to what you’re writing, and you have your favorite snack and beverage before you do so. Maybe you do a yoga routine or even watch a movie or tv show. Ultimately, how you prepare to write is up to you, but I do think that it’s something to look into doing, just the idea that after some time, your brain will use these as triggers to settle down and focus, instead of wanting to go a million miles a minute.

I just want to clarify that these tips might not work for you, but if you have some tips that worked for you, please feel free to share them! I think ultimately it will vary from writer to writer, and maybe you just really need your favorite spot for inspiration. Above all else, however, I’m truly praying for you. During this time of uncertainty and concern, I pray that you and your family remain safe. Remember to follow the suggested protocol, try to keep others safe who might be highly contagious, and above all please, be polite to others. The saddest part about this isn’t even the disease itself, but rather how people are reacting. Be kind and courteous, think before you make large purchases of items (no shame, just remember there are other people), be courteous to retail employees (it’s already been a time for them), and if you see an opportunity to help- do it. I understand (especially as somebody who has an autoimmune disease and asthma) that it’s a dangerous time, but again, if the opportunity presents itself-help, that’s really the only way we’re going to actually make it out of this situation okay.

SERIOUS PARAGRAPH OVER, I hope y’all have a ginchy week, and I’d love to know, what’re your motivational writing tips when you have to write at home/or need inspiration?

NaNoWriMo 2019

Well, (1)

Right, so NaNoWriMo.

The holiday that all writers celebrate. It’s like a secret code.

“Oh sorry I can’t make it, I’ve got too much to do, NaNo Wrimo and all.”

And then you the signature “WAT”

Even if you do try to write every year, and they ask that…every year.

Listen, like Inktober is to the Artist, NaNo Wrimo is to the writer. It’s like a push, it’s what we do to drive ourselves insane.

And I for one am failing.

In the name of academics and distracted Youtube videos, but I’m failing none-the-less.

But still, I’m bouncing between two stories because I really can’t decide. (I’m easily distracted and love both my stories equally.

SO ANYWAY.

I wanted to talk a little bit about my works (because I’m fabulous like that), and give an idea of what I’m aiming for, this NaNo Wrimo.

When Crime Became Known Justice

I’ve pitched this before on here, and yes it’s a lengthy title, but I’m not fabulous at titles, so it’ll work for now. Now, about the story…

“Ace Yedgerson never backed down from a promise. And with this one, it was no expectation. The same case he promised to investigate for Zanie Sharper, was the same case that led him to walk away from his beloved job as a police officer for Buffalo. The case? Twenty-one year old Harper Mayberry, kidnapped, and her sister found dead in her apartment. The consensus? Uncertain, until now. Because there’s a new Detective Agency in town, and they don’t let cases close until they’ve found the culprit, and they’ll do whatever it takes to show Buffalo what Justice is supposed to be.”

The Cities Darkest Light

Elle Harper was completely out of Asa Conwell’s league. There was no doubt about it-the two were night and day; they were completely different-but without one, the other would almost seem unimportant, and most likely cause damage. And while the two of them tried their hardest to be strong and independent, at the end of the day; they simply weren’t. Two years together had taught them that.
And in two years, it appeared that they weren’t the only ones with a budding romance. Which, Elle and Asa discover on one rather fateful day.
The rundown?
Chandler Harper, CEO of Hopewell’s Electronics goes missing the same day he’s found getting cozy with the secretary. That same day, Maureen Harper seemingly goes insane, and ultimately, the secretary is found dead.
Naturally, Elle Harper is up for top contenders on the suspect list. Lucky for her, it’s part of Asa’s job to find who’s innocent and who’s guilty, and he’s not one to make exceptions, no matter how dangerous, or close to home it actually gets.

Both of these stories are mysteries, and they do have a romance aspect to them, but I genuinely enjoy them.

Now that you know what I’m working on, let’s observe my goals.

Very simply, write ten chapters I enjoy for each work.

Crazy, right?

Here’s the thing, I’m studying for a very large part of my life (SATS), and failure is not something I will accept a second time.

SO

I’m trying to balance both, without wanting to poke my eyeballs out.

Too late, but a girl can try.

So now, the real question stands.

Are you, good friend, willing to take even the most simple of NaNoWriMo challenges, or are you chilling on the sidelines?

Because either’s cool, I find personally, that it’s one of those months that has a universal goal, but it’s a different journey for everyone, and it’s subjective for each person. Like for my brother, he’s never written a story before in his life, but he’s recently had a story idea he can’t shake and wants to work on it. NaNoWriMo for him is just learning the basics, like creating characters and the basics, and that’s okay.

That being said, I’d love to hear your goals for NaNoWriMo, and as it’s the month of writing, not to be too blatantly obvious, but definitely check out Grammarly, It’s pretty much a lifesaver, and once you write and draft your book, you’re going to need some more editing, and Grammarly is definitely the way to go (my mom has the app on her phone and loves it).

SO, your challenge, is to tell me what your plans are this November/NaNoWriMo, and tell me, if you could see any prompt/trope put into a movie/book, what would it be?

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I HAVE A STORY

Well

Can somebody direct me into a Crash Course on Click Bate titles? Please?

I digress, grab a drink and a hearty bowl of popcorn, marshmallows, and chocolate (Fany cooking post coming soon)-and settle down, because boy, do I have a story for you.

So recently I’ve had to take a bit of a break from blogging-and as I’ve stated, mentally and physically, I’ve been through some stuff.

That being said- during that time I was surviving off of college classes and other classes-specifically, an English class.

And might I just say, English class actually gave me quite a bit of anxiety.

I know, I know, the irony.

See, the thing is, I’m a lot of things (entertaining, adorable, clever, the list goes on), but I am above all, not the most excellent person; grammatically. I might have a general idea, but everything I’ve grown up with (from how to place commas, to fragments), was blown completely out of the water.

So anyway, my teacher was a good teacher, she worked with my constant emails (midnight panics as my grade dropped from a B to a B minus), and was overall very reasonable.

Again, though, grammar was suddenly something I was lacking in, and very suddenly, I couldn’t stand constructive criticism.

So it was my last paper rounding the corner, I had managed to pass that, but the paper I had worked so hard on (How to Save the World), had failed. My teacher had, however, given me the chance to rewrite it, and boy, did I take it.

My citation, it was scum, I was at the writing center twice, to find out how, and then to double-check that I had done it right-however, I still needed to do more.

The grammar, total trash, the layout? Actual peril.

My poor internet besties had to listen to my panic attacks about my grade as well as everything else.

And while there are benefits to being good friends with a plethora of writers, they couldn’t be at my beck and call, trying to fix the mess that was my paper.

What they could do, however, was come up with one HEXUVA suggestion.

Try Grammarly.

Naturally, I was like “Psshh, yeah, whatever”, the stubborn bored person in me doesn’t take help from ANYONE.

However, the stubborn bored person also needed to make sure this grammar hit the mark, and while I was still prodding through fixing it, and it had bettered a great deal, it was still something that you’d find in a Wattpad fan-fiction (A.K.A every single one of my stories).

So I relented, and made the plunge, opening up the browser, I created an account.

And I pasted my paper to the little checker and wow-WAS I SURPRISED. While it did give me general things that I had missed, it also showed me where to tighten up my paper, and things beyond that. Suddenly, I was seeing mistakes, and realizing how I could make the paper better!

And the happily ever after lands where we are today with a nice healthy B.

The point is, that yes, I’m here to promote Grammarly, but my desire to, came from what I experienced from it, and can I just say, the help it provided was incredible. I HIGHLY suggest, that if you’re a student, blogger, or writer (or in general just a person who relies on proper grammar), you check out Grammarly-which I happen to have a link for.

 

That being said, let me know do you use Grammarly? What are your thoughts about it?

New post coming Wednesday!

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So I’ve Put Together a List of Writing Help

Well

So I’ve done a thing…

I’ve found some very interesting ways to improve your writing.

Whether it be prompts to tips on the internet-Welcome to your go-to-guide on Writing Help.

Let’s have a look-see at what’s been found.

1) Writing Prompts

Writing Prompts are incredibly helpful, and I believe I have found the best source, would The Fake Red Head. She has writing tips and prompts that can be accessed on both her blog-and on Pinterest.

2) Grammar Advice

If your anything like yours truly, you might find that you have a hard time with certain types of grammar rules/writing. There is help for that so you don’t have to spend hours browsing the internet looking for the perfect source, I can give you the one I learned from my English Class. (My college English class, so you know – educated). Grammar Girl has been the best-found source, and personally, I do enjoy the advice it gives. It offers the information, practice activities and provides it in a way that’s short and simple.

3) Character Creation

Having a hard time figuring out how to write a character-or even creating a character? Well here’s a Character Generator website for you to check out. It offer’s fun details about a character, and gives you a chance to expand your horizons on how you usually write characters!

4) Character Profile

Dani Lee Collins offers excellent tips and layout profile templates for those in. With an array of other articles on the website- this one, in particular, offers the templates that I would highly suggest using.

5) Grammar Checking

Unsurprisingly, one of the websites that I’m here to suggest to you is commonly known- and used already. If you haven’t heard of it though; and you’re looking for an excellent grammar checking website (I’m currently using it to write this post and if you think this version is bad, you should see the errors that pop up while writing it) is Grammarly. There are a variety of ways you could use Grammarly, and I actually used it to double-check errors made in my essays.

6) Story Structures

While there are a plethora of sources for finding the perfect way to layout your story,  Kristen Kieffer, of Well-Storied offers an excellent source, providing 3 plot structures -giving you the optimal options for your storytelling.

With these websites, I hope you find some help with whatever your struggles might be. I personally have recently discovered or used these sources for a while. As someone who’s just getting back into the writing game, I find myself more excited about the idea of using these.

And don’t worry, if you’re more of a mobile device user (I started off that way), then I have a list compiled of the apps I suggest for you.

Mobile Alternatives.png

Have you used any of these sources-and if so, what are your thoughts? Do you have any source suggestions? I’d love to know!

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Articles Referenced

Kieffer, Kristen. “3 Awesome Plot Structures For Building Bestsellers – Well-Storied.” Well-Storied, Well-Storied., 8 Feb. 2015, https://www.well-storied.com/blog/3-awesome-plot-structures-for-building-bestsellers

Collins, Dani Lee. “Free Character Profile Template: The Author’s Journey.” Dani Lee Collins, 27 Nov. 2018, http://www.danileecollins.com/2018/05/character-profiles/

 

A Personal Piece of Heaven, with a Taste of Hell

Everytime I walk into the room, somethings different. A small thing, even my perspective.

Been living in it for a while, some days feelin’ like I’m dying in it. I dream my dreams, plan my schemes. That rooms where I had my best days, thought I was great, came back to ground zero, feel nothing but hate. It’s where my nightmares were born, my fears and addictions stormed. That room is where I lived for so long, my personal piece of heaven, mixed with a taste of hell.

It’s where I’d go to hide, to lock my tears inside. It’s where my nails met my skin, invisible scars that shouldn’t have been. It’s where I’d go to cry at nights-whether it sending a prayer to God, asking Him to make it alright. To show me things I shouldn’t, to make me a person I couldn’t be. That rooms where I dealt with rejection; fought against affection. Rejected God, claimed a passion for things I couldn’t stand with. I lost myself in that room, but I found myself there, too. A lot’s happened in that little room. My personal heaven, a retreat if you will,, but where I retreat to find emotions inside. Welcome to my slither of heaven, with a taste of hell.

Writers Boot Camp: Side Characters

Of course, with any good story, comes the side characters to support it.

Let me put it like this:

Support walls are taken for granted until the ceiling falls in.

Now the image is in your head of your side characters (that you most likely haven’t created yet), are stuck in a wall, I’d just like to say, welcome back to Week Four of Boot Camp.

You seem to be shaping up very nicely.

You’re story is slowly starting to come along, and now we’ve reached a key part.

If you couldn’t tell-it’s our side characters, the important best-friend, but not the main character.

Of course, every story has the following Side character:

The bully

The best friend.

However, your story has to hold more then these two bits of information, so let’s explore the world of creating your characters.

1. Start with the supportive role-the Best Friend

Or at the very least, the key influencial person in your main character’s life.

Try to pick out traits that your character doesn’t posses, and add them into the story. Perhaps your main character is a bit more impulsive, however the advice-giving character would most likely be a little bit more thought out, or perhaps it’s the other way around, either way, make sure that there is a chance for conflict, even if the characters lack that later on the story-this gives a few opportunities to help cut back on writer’s block, if need be.

2. Note the Important Characteristics

While you won’t need to know specifically if your Supporting-side-role is a Crest toothpaste fan, or not (unless you have a seen for that, planned, in which case, I chime in to say the whitening tooth paste does not, in fact, work), you will need to have an idea of characteristics that stick out in the character’s personality, such as being an eternal optimist, or having a dog fetish (I NEED TO KNOW, for scientific reasons, of course).

3. Don’t forget the negative traits – Just to sprinkle in the drama….

*spills vat of quarks and qualms into character*

Make certain that the side characters aren’t just very wise, and incredibly in tune with emotions and life itself. (Or in some stories cases, completely ignorant with a splash of annoying). Perhaps you’re character is an eternal optimist, toward everyone else, however, they make self-deprecating jokes. Or they are incredibly confident, and have a tendency to be over baring.The choice is yours, just avoid over-exaggerating.

4. Don’t be afraid to give your side-characters as much depth as your main character. Harry Potter wouldn’t have been as good with Dumbledore, or the Weasley twins. The same concept goes for Guardians of the Galaxy, or even Little Women.

5. Build a back story for your character. It can be easy to let it slip by (or even over build), a back story for your side character. Perhaps their parents are divorced, or they have a good home life, but something is still holding them back? Why is that?

*To avoid over-building, try to get the basics, but don’t go from age one to their current age, as nice as it might be, you’re characters side characters also should not take up ALL or even a majority of the story. This could also be helpful, should you decide that you want to write a book surrounding a side character.

Okay, now this is just a general run-down of how to build your side characters, understand that they aren’t an under-rated main character, they’re just as important.

I expect to see you back next week, ready to take on the next part of this boot camp.

Be practicing.

Stay Ginchy!

HaziWords

Boot Camp: The Main Squeezes

Well hello there,

I see your back.

Was last week not hard enough for you? Well get ready, because this week is about to be a whole lot harder.

Last week we went over how to start a plot.

This week?

We’re getting to the Poster of the story, what keeps it looking fresh, the Politicians to our countries; our main characters.

That’s right, we’re talking about how to start with a character (which I actually received a few tips from my friends-something I’m eternally grateful for)!

1. Start with a name- Something I found interesting was discovering that some writers actually chose names with meaning behind them. Choose your character’s name based off of the meaning.

2. Add a positive trait. Make certain to give the character a distinct trait that appears throughout the book-one that remains constant, or perhaps grows stronger.

3. Add a Negative trait. This trait won’t change, but will be something that appears as a battle, or even something they struggle to recognize. Even at the end of the book, let them continue to have this trait; this will give you, and your readers something to relate to.

4. Add traits that coincide with the first two, and then add an odd-ball. One person doesn’t have a set of traits they follow, and internal conflict of your character is very important, this is highly common in popular stories. It’s a unique idea, but once again, gives your reader something they can relate to, and watch eagerly for the change.

5. Add appearance outlines. While in your story you might not describe the character word-for-word, it’s still important to give at least yourself, a general idea of what your character looks like. Uncertain about appearances? Take certain physical traits from your characters (not literally), and add them together.

6. Add a partner-in-crime. Or perhaps, your character is a loner, either way, it’s important to add multiple characters of some sort for dialogue. Using the steps above, create a character that is the bread to your main character(s) butter.

Most importantly, don’t freak out. Creating characters and developing connections with them can be hard, but you’re hard headed, after all, that’s why your here.

I hope to see you back next week, and let’s hope you did your studying, because it’s going to be an interesting one.