So I’ve Put Together a List of Writing Help

Well

So I’ve done a thing…

I’ve found some very interesting ways to improve your writing.

Whether it be prompts to tips on the internet-Welcome to your go-to-guide on Writing Help.

Let’s have a look-see at what’s been found.

1) Writing Prompts

Writing Prompts are incredibly helpful, and I believe I have found the best source, would The Fake Red Head. She has writing tips and prompts that can be accessed on both her blog-and on Pinterest.

2) Grammar Advice

If your anything like yours truly, you might find that you have a hard time with certain types of grammar rules/writing. There is help for that so you don’t have to spend hours browsing the internet looking for the perfect source, I can give you the one I learned from my English Class. (My college English class, so you know – educated). Grammar Girl has been the best-found source, and personally, I do enjoy the advice it gives. It offers the information, practice activities and provides it in a way that’s short and simple.

3) Character Creation

Having a hard time figuring out how to write a character-or even creating a character? Well here’s a Character Generator website for you to check out. It offer’s fun details about a character, and gives you a chance to expand your horizons on how you usually write characters!

4) Character Profile

Dani Lee Collins offers excellent tips and layout profile templates for those in. With an array of other articles on the website- this one, in particular, offers the templates that I would highly suggest using.

5) Grammar Checking

Unsurprisingly, one of the websites that I’m here to suggest to you is commonly known- and used already. If you haven’t heard of it though; and you’re looking for an excellent grammar checking website (I’m currently using it to write this post and if you think this version is bad, you should see the errors that pop up while writing it) is Grammarly. There are a variety of ways you could use Grammarly, and I actually used it to double-check errors made in my essays.

6) Story Structures

While there are a plethora of sources for finding the perfect way to layout your story,  Kristen Kieffer, of Well-Storied offers an excellent source, providing 3 plot structures -giving you the optimal options for your storytelling.

With these websites, I hope you find some help with whatever your struggles might be. I personally have recently discovered or used these sources for a while. As someone who’s just getting back into the writing game, I find myself more excited about the idea of using these.

And don’t worry, if you’re more of a mobile device user (I started off that way), then I have a list compiled of the apps I suggest for you.

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Have you used any of these sources-and if so, what are your thoughts? Do you have any source suggestions? I’d love to know!

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Articles Referenced

Kieffer, Kristen. “3 Awesome Plot Structures For Building Bestsellers – Well-Storied.” Well-Storied, Well-Storied., 8 Feb. 2015, https://www.well-storied.com/blog/3-awesome-plot-structures-for-building-bestsellers

Collins, Dani Lee. “Free Character Profile Template: The Author’s Journey.” Dani Lee Collins, 27 Nov. 2018, http://www.danileecollins.com/2018/05/character-profiles/

 

Story Starter Boot Camp: Settings

Now, I know what you’re thinking.

About food, most likely, or I don’t know, on the off chance you’re thinking about me posting…

Well…

I’m a teenager who takes a lot in, being a drill sergeant isn’t really my niche.

But you know what is?

Running this story starter boot camp!

It’s time to delve deep into the world of settings, and when I say world, I mean more then just your settings or world-this is becoming more complicated then it should be.

Sharpen your pencils, have a test “Clickety-clack” on your keyboard, and let’s “clickety-crack” down.

(I am SO not sorry).

*(Yes, I really am).

Settings can be complicated, especially for yours truly, often times I leave alot to be desired, and I think it’s something several writers can attest to having trouble with.

Especially when writing about a place you don’t know too much about, which is, when starting a story and setting the scene, I’ve got a few tips to get the inspiration grooven’ and the general information and fundamental’s moven’.

(Again I am both sorry, and not sorry).

1. Bust out the travel guides.

When creating a story, it’s often said that you write what you know-where you’ve been, what you’ve done, but if you’re anything like me, this concept can be a little awkward, as you try to write your stories furthest from reality. However, while writing what you know is a definite contender, I suggest you break out the travel guides, to get an idea of where you want your story to take place, and get some general information.

2. Map your place.

Now that you’ve chosen your place, whether it be city direct, or just a general providence/state, get a general idea of where your story is taking place. Are you creating a town in France? Where in France? Is it set permanently in France, or do they travel around? While these are things you might nowt have planned out just yet, it’s important to think about, and get a map set up of where you think the city, whether imaginary or real, is, and what opportunities surround it.

3. Dive into History

Now, I’m not a personal fan of History, I could never memorize dates, and to be honest, events don’t fascinate me as much as humans interactions.

*AHEM*

Psychology.

I digress, it’s still very important to have general information and history on this town, whether that’s something you have to create (I will release a blog post on this topic following boot camp), or a history existing. This will give you some description to play with, a possibly something to revert back to, should your story need it.

4. Research Cultures, Traditions, Religion, Population, and any other social aspects of things that occur in the country/area that your story is set in. It would be very strange to have a prominent Jewish community if it were actually Catholic or possibly Buddhist community. Make certain to note the struggles that your characters might have. Don’t forget to research the industry, and social status, as this information can also play into your character.

5. Research the Architecture, as well as the people’s responses to outsiders, and in general their responses to social situations.

I’m not sure how logical a Tudor home in predominately traditional Spanish style villas. It would also be strange to have the characters open to outsiders, if they were struggling after a war.

Of course, while this is just the general idea for setting the scene, a few more tips for this will be listed down below with your prompt of the day, and your tip.

***********

As always, I hope to see you back next week, pencil ready, thinking caps on, because we’re not even close to finished on your work of art.

Week One: Plotting Things

Suit up, soldier, we’re going into battle.

I mean, the battle of the mind, and this week, in the Week One of Story Starter Boot Camp, we’re going over how to start the plotting process. And to all you plotting to murder someone, or go after the fridge, or the Declaration of Independence (I don’t know what you do on your past time, I just like to believe that you all are doing it well, and living your best life), sit down, this isn’t for you.

The blue prints were hard to get, okay?

What?

I have a lot of time in between sleeping and living.

Like, three minutes, but don’t judge me.

I digress, you’ve gotten me off track!

Here’s some tips on how to start a plot.

Pens and Notepads…

ready…

1. Start with the scenery.

I actually went to this Writing Conference, where published author, Amanda J. Mcgee,

talked about scenery, and the importance of it. (By the way, I’ve just got to say, I do not have scenery writing capabilities as of yet, but we will get their). Her advice was to write about a place we know (this is not a direct quote, most of my things are still in boxes while I slim down my collection of things…). So if you’re having a hard time writing a scenery, write what you know about. Write about something your familiar with. Hex, go to the grocery store and take it all in. Write it down, the experience, maybe write about you being there, or stretch the tale a bit of what happened. (I’ve got to say, her suggestion was possibly the most effective one).

2. Bring in a character.

Who would fit in the scenery? Who wouldn’t? Now that you have the scenery, start to choose your ammunition. Perhaps your character is at a Hot Topic, but they’re actually a prep (I mean, to be fair, as much as I want to belong, I don’t think I fit in Hot Topic like I’d like). Maybe it’s a Skater Kid, who’s a book worm, you don’t know. Add conflicting quarks to your character. Give your character another internal turmoil, besides what the main story path.

3. Pick a Genre

So now you have a scenery, your main character(s), now it’s time to pick your genre. Make sure it fits, and your not forcing it. Start with just one genre, perhaps it’s a fantasy story that the scenery and characters fit in. Now that you have those, this should be a little easier.

4. Work on a conversation

This can be anywhere in the story, in any situation, it doesn’t matter, just write a dialogue for your character. Try to imagine them actually having this conversation.

Of course, now that you’re working on this, it’s going to take time to put together a plot. This is just the foundation, to build your story up, it’s going to take some creativity.

Your Assignment this week: Start with the Scenery and Characters. One bite at a time-write a scene, and then add the character.

Study These Tips, and take them (or don’t, it doesn’t bug me), to heart.

I hope to see you back next week, in better shape!

***I should make it clear I’m not a professional, and I do things a bit backward. If this doesn’t work for you, don’t be surprised, I’m still new to this, but I genuinely hope this helps!***

Remember to live your life like the ginchy story that it is!

HaziWords

Story Starter Boot Camp OverView

I took a nap yesterday and I’m just now feeling like my normal self, so if that doesn’t explain why I don’t take naps, I don’t know what will.

WELL HELLO THERE.

That was aggressive, but also completely besides the point.

It ’tis I, the great Hazi, the writing QUEEN, here to give you your dream series, the series we’ve all wanted, but never had.

All in one neat 2 month (technically it’s Seven Weeks of Tips, not Eight, but let’s roll with it), package.

Now of course, you might be wondering, what’s the series going to cover? Is this like those church series that Pastor’s have? Am I going to have to bring a notebook? Should I chug caffeine? Should I bring bandages because you’re going to say things that hurt?

NO.

Except maybe caffeine, I mean, if you need caffeine, I guess? Weirdly enough they have these caffeine chocolate bars at my college campus, and I don’t know how to feel about them.

*Sip Diet Aspartame*

Moving On.

This series is for all of you out there struggling with how to start a story, when you want to start one, but those characters won’t flow, the story line won’t mold, or those thoughts that won’t make since. It’s for the insomniacs who want something to think about besides how exhausted they are (been there). It’s for the writers who have finished novels and are working on there next, and most of all, it’s for me.

Because let me tell you, writing a book from scratch is not easy.

So, what will this series boot camp provide?

Prompts

Advice

Writing Drills (It’s now a thing)

Reading and Writing Assignments

Rhetorical Questions (That you have to answer in your head)

Sarcasm (Because it wouldn’t be my type of series without it).

Are you ready?

Good.

Now, for an overview.

Now it’s occurred to me a calendar set up might work, but I’ve also come to realize that I don’t actually know how to make those, and these posts go up weekly on Tuesdays (with the exception of Today-Wednesday, because of my nap yesterday).

So, enjoy this super-aesthetic bulletin schedule I’ve put together.

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What you will need:

Your Favorite Pen (If you don’t have one-get one, treasure it, yell at others for touching it, clean it, loose it, cry about loosing it, find a new favorite pen.)

A Notebook (But not a pretty one, because if you’re like me, your dedication won’t stick).

A Determined Attitude

Creativity

Enthusiasm

Are you ready? Because these next few weeks are going to be quiet the journey, and I’m going to need your best work!

Stay Ginchy, Get Rest, and be ready to shine.

HaziWords

 

 

Writing Tips (I’m kind of a genius)

Greetings and salutations! It ’tis I, Hazi!

So originally I was going to make a post on how NOT to start a story, however, I’ve found myself picking up a few writers tips, so, here I am to introduce you to some of the tips and tricks I’ve picked up recently.

Let’s roll out.

***I’m coming for your brand, Optimus Prime.****

1. A Play List

But not just a playlist, but a playlist for my characters themselves. Often times, I think it helps me get in the mood.

Like on Wattpad (Shameless plug, check out my current running story-Anonymous), I have a character, Miles, and whilst trying to find a playlist that inspired me, it pained me to admit that he wasn’t the nostalgic listener like I though-but actually liked Imagination Dragons, and Twenty-One Pilots, both okay bands, but considering I’ve had friends who played them endlessly, not my thing. But seriously, taking into account that I like to write characters from all walks of life, and enjoyments, I think getting a general idea of their tunes would definitely be something that would count.

2. An inspiration board.

Seriously, when I’m trying to write out a story, I often find myself stuck. Not to mention, we create inspiration boards for ourselves, why not for our characters? It’s like taking an Aesthetic board to a whole new level. Take clippings of places that might look like settings, quotes, clothing styles, and hey, if you want, even add the type of actor/actresses you’d like to play if your story were to become a movie (unless you are writing a movie, because then your that much closer to actor/actress idea). And if you’re the type who is writing non-fiction, the same still goes, just use images about what your writing about, as well as quotes.

3. If you get stuck, try a new approach.

I think one of the hardest thing’s I’ve learned is how I can continue on a story line. As a writer, especially fictional writing, we’re expected to write people’s escape from society, and add twists and turns. Rather then staying on the same path, maybe you need to switch it up for yourself. I’m not saying you should change the murderer if all the clues pointed to them, but if you wanted, go back through and scatter a few more, and switch it up for you as well. Not only will this keep YOU interested, but your readers will be more then happy to have the change.

4. Try living as your Character

Okay, so I actually made a blog post a good while ago about this, but in sum up, I suggested living as your character to the best of your ability. It’s like a fun cosplay, only you get to experience things a little bit more as your own character. For example, you may have to go to school, but maybe you should interact the same way your character might (or don’t, I get that school can be brutal), maybe try out their diet (if you don’t have a special one you have to follow-don’t hurt yourself from this AT ALL), or their morning routine. Maybe just wear something that reminds you of your character. Either way, give cosplay of your child a try.

That got weird fast.

5. Do some Mundane Chores

This one’s a weird one, right? But here’s the thing, where I work, I usually end up having to wipe down tables which is actually just really, really boring. However, I try to entertain myself, by either talking to God, or working on my stories. Seriously, the amount of quirky conversations my characters have while I’m working is just…wild. So if you’re having a hard time getting all of that down, just do a few mundane chores. Maybe you can combine the top, previous, and current suggestion, to have one big mash?

Not to mention, you’re getting stuff done, so it’s a big win!

That wraps up this weeks Writer’s Square. I’ll be releasing a new February schedule soon, which will be a bit more light, mainly because I’m starting one of my classes that might take up more time.

That being said, do you have any writing tips? Have you tried any of these writing tips? I’d love to know!

Remember to live your life like the ginchy story that it is!

HaziWords